Top Ten Tuesday: Childhood Favourites Revisited

The Book Wars

Top Ten Tuesday

A meme by The Broke And The Bookish! Join the fun; leave us a comment! 🙂

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  1. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by Jo Rowling: I don’t re-read a lot of stuff from when I was a kid. Not unless it’s for a class, and I don’t have classes anymore! This one is the exception, though. I can read it always and still enjoy it!
  2. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett: I am honestly shocked at myself that I haven’t yet listened to the BBC radio play.
  3. Tintin by Hergé: Gonna be honest, I can’t re-read this anymore and not be majorly annoyed. BUT I have a soft spot for the TV show which I used to watch with my Dad. Good times.
  4. Artemis Fowl and the Eternity Code by Eoin Colfer: I could re-read this on any given day. Or re-listen. Nathaniel Parker should do more audiobooks …

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On Fictional Female Friendship

The Book Wars

Before I say anything else, let me draw your attention to the title and clarify that when I say “Fictional Female Friendship” (whoa the alliteration), I’m talking about female friendship that appears in fiction and not implying that female friendship is fictional (which if you read enough YA novels can persuade you is true). Right? Right!

A week or so ago, I was browsing my feed on Instagram and I saw that my friend Brigid had posted the picture below and added the sad fact that while friendships between boys can be described as done below, friendship between female characters in books, particularly YA as that is the genre I am most familiar with, rarely gets the same attention and acceptance. (The book is The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater and is most excellent.)

Photo Credit: She_is_Brigid Photo Credit: She_is_Brigid

We’ve all heard of the Bechdel Test, right? No?

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Where communication between two…

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No Reconciliation without Recognition: A Personal History of the Armenian Genocide

Media Diversified

by Robert Kazandjian

On April 24, Armenians worldwide will commemorate the centenary of the Armenian Genocide. In 1915, Ottoman authorities arrested approximately 250 prominent Armenian community figures and intellectuals in Constantinople, the majority of whom were executed. The great poet Daniel Varoujan was disembowelled before his eyes were gouged out. The carnage spread like a malignancy across the land; cultural leaders were rounded up and murdered, silencing voices of resistance and leaving communities vulnerable to attack. Tens of thousands of able-bodied Armenian men serving in the Ottoman Army were forced to disarm, transferred to labour battalions and then butchered by bayonet or gunshot while performing work duties. Wholesale deportation of all Armenians from Eastern Anatolia to concentration camps in the scorching Syrian Desert was ordered. Deportation was code for massacre. Men, women and children were slaughtered. The barbaric methodology varied. Those who survived the death marches were left to starve…

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Review: All The Rage by Courtney Summers

The Book Wars

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The sheriff’s son, Kellan Turner, is not the golden boy everyone thinks he is, and Romy Grey knows that for a fact. Because no one wants to believe a girl from the wrong side of town, the truth about him has cost her everything—friends, family, and her community. Branded a liar and bullied relentlessly by a group of kids she used to hang out with, Romy’s only refuge is the diner where she works outside of town. No one knows her name or her past there; she can finally be anonymous. But when a girl with ties to both Romy and Kellan goes missing after a party, and news of him assaulting another girl in a town close by gets out, Romy must decide whether she wants to fight or carry the burden of knowing more girls could get hurt if she doesn’t speak up. Nobody believed her the first…

View original post 653 more words

Review: All The Rage by Courtney Summers

The Book Wars

21853636

The sheriff’s son, Kellan Turner, is not the golden boy everyone thinks he is, and Romy Grey knows that for a fact. Because no one wants to believe a girl from the wrong side of town, the truth about him has cost her everything—friends, family, and her community. Branded a liar and bullied relentlessly by a group of kids she used to hang out with, Romy’s only refuge is the diner where she works outside of town. No one knows her name or her past there; she can finally be anonymous. But when a girl with ties to both Romy and Kellan goes missing after a party, and news of him assaulting another girl in a town close by gets out, Romy must decide whether she wants to fight or carry the burden of knowing more girls could get hurt if she doesn’t speak up. Nobody believed her the first…

View original post 653 more words

Weekend Edition – Planting the Seeds of a Writing Life Plus Good Reads and Writing Tips

Live to Write - Write to Live

Planting the Seeds of a Writing Life

seedlingThere is no short cut to creating a writing life.

There is no 3-step process, no silver bullet, no magic spell.

You plant the seeds. You water. You wait.

Sometimes you say nice things, nurturing words of encouragement and inspiration.

Sometimes you slip up, and mutter dark, sharp things under your breath. Cutting things that slice carelessly into tender green shoots.

But somehow, the seedling survives.

You say you’re sorry. You add some nutrients to the soil. You let some sunshine in.

You keep writing.

Some days, you think you know how this writing life will turn out. You feel like you have a plan. A purpose. A path. It all makes sense, and you work away – pruning and fertilizing – secure in your sense of certainty.

But then, one day, a new blossom appears, and you don’t recognize it. It doesn’t…

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